News and Announcements

News, Announcements and Events

Transforming Breast Cancer Together: European Elections Manifesto 2019 Seizing the opportunities for breast cancer patients

Date posted: September 18, 2019

We are delighted to report that an article WWC has contributed to, as part of the Transforming Breast Cancer Together Initiative, has been published online in The Breast – an international, multidisciplinary journal for researchers and clinicians, which focuses on translational and clinical research for the advancement of breast cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment of all stage.

With the European Parliament elections having taken place in May 2019 and a new European Commission (EC) taking office in November 2019, this year is critical for European policymakers, as goals and priorities of the European Union (EU) for the next five years will be discussed and agreed upon.

This Manifesto issued by the Transforming Breast Cancer Together initiative calls upon policymakers to improve services for patients in an area still of high unmet need and to reduce the societal impact of breast cancer by elevating it as a health policy priority to improve breast cancer prevention, diagnosis and care across Europe.

The article can be accessed via a Share Link, a personalized URL providing 50 days’ free access to the article.  Click on this link before November 02, 2019 and you will be taken directly to the article in ScienceDirect, which you are welcome to read or download.   No sign up, registration or fees are required.

Your personalised Share Link can be found here

 

 

IES’ Stephen Bevan joins Working With Cancer as an Ambassador

Date posted: September 17, 2019

We are delighted to announce that Stephen Bevan is joining Working With Cancer as an Ambassador, to raise awareness of working during and after cancer.

Stephen is Head of HR R&D at the Institute for Employment Studies (IES). Previously was Director of Research at The Work Foundation, Lancaster University. His expertise lies in both his research and consultancy on the future health of the UK workforce and the ways that the world of work is likely to change over the next 30 years. He was the lead author of a book looking at the future of work (21st Century Workforces & Workplaces) published by Butterworth in 2018. He is Visiting Scientist at the Centre for Musculoskeletal Health & Work at Southampton University and was an advisor to the Government’s Thriving at Work review of mental health and employment. Stephen was an Honorary Professor at Lancaster University Management School between 2011 and 2018 and has been voted one of the UK’s ‘most influential’ HR Thinkers by HR Magazine. In October 2018 Stephen was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer and has recently returned to work after surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

Full details on the appointment can be found here

 

Continuation of Research Project at University of Hertfordshire

Date posted: September 12, 2019

Last year we supported a research study about returning to work after cancer Treatment.  Andrew Parsons and Colleen Addicott from the University of Hertfordshire (UoH) have been able to present key findings and recommendations at National and International Psychological Conferences. Their results suggest that:

  • People undergo a change in their world view regarding themselves and their work.
  • The individuals’ psychological resources were an important part of successfully returning to work after treatment.
  • Line managers and colleagues play a key role – their ability to communicate effectively with and support their colleagues who have cancer is a key factor
  • A ‘one size fits all’ organisational approach to returning to work is not likely to be very effective. It needs to be person centred and tailored to the individual.

The UoH Team is now keen to expand the work. The aim of the next study is to further investigate the psychological impact of a range of life events on a person’s self-concept and meaning of work,  and, to have input from individuals with a broader range of different life-events to allow comparison of their impact.

If you are interested in taking part in this study, please follow this link.

https://herts.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_88IkSrCUsuFiJfL

All.Can Patient Survey: ‘Patient insights on cancer care: opportunities for improving efficiency’

Date posted: July 31, 2019

All.Can international have released a new report titled ‘Patient insights on cancer care: opportunities for improving efficiency’.  The report reveals findings from an international survey on the patient perspective of inefficiencies in cancer care. With insights from almost 4,000 patients in more than 10 countries, the report identifies four key areas of opportunity for improvement:

1. Ensure swift, accurate and appropriately delivered diagnosis
2. Improve information-sharing, support and shared decision-making
3. Make integrated multidisciplinary care a reality for all patients
4. Address the financial impact of cancer

You can find the full report here

Language guides to support those with Advanced and Metastatic Breast Cancer

Date posted: April 12, 2019

What would you say to a friend or patient with advanced or metastatic breast cancer? Do you know what that is and what it means for the person with that diagnosis? In March this year two language guides were published by Novartis which provide practical tips and recommendations about how to talk to patients with either advanced or metastatic breast cancer and/or their relatives.

The two guides represent the outcome of two rounds of consultation with the Patient Community (Breast Cancer patients – various stages) and Breast Cancer Experts (Oncologists, Nurses, Psycho-oncologist), and are meant to facilitate a difficult dialogue around a topic that’s too often a “taboo”.

Read more/download the guides here: Language guide HCP final   Language guide non HCP final

Important initial research findings about the psychological engagement of people returning to work after cancer

Date posted:

In 2018, WWC supported a research study conducted by our associate Andrew Parsons at the University of Hertfordshire.  Andrew (with his Supervisor Dr Colleen Addicott), presented his initial findings at the British Psychological Society, Division of Occupational Psychology meeting in Chester on the 9th January 2019. The title of the talk was “The aftershock of  coming back to work: Work engagement in Cancer Survivors”.

To read about their initial research findings click here

‘Transforming Breast Cancer Together’ Initiative: Manifesto Launch

Date posted: April 10, 2019

Breast cancer is still the leading cause of death in women. Prevention, screening and care must be made a priority on EU and national agendas. We are proud to be part of a European initiative to raise awareness & drive change.

Read the press release and Manifesto, published today, to find out more.

 

Liz O’Riordan joins Working With Cancer to promote benefits of work during cancer treatment

Date posted: March 20, 2019

 We are delighted to announce that Liz O’Riordan is joining Working With Cancer as an Ambassador.

Liz will be promoting Working With Cancer at events and online, as part of their work in helping cancer patients and their carers manage work and treatment on a practical and emotional level.

Liz was a 40-year-old consultant breast surgeon when she was diagnosed with Stage 3 breast cancer in July 2015. She suddenly realised that she had no idea what it was like to be a patient, despite spending her working life treating the disease. She started an award-winning blog to help doctors and patients see what having breast cancer is really like, in a friendly, informative way (liz.oriordan.co.uk) and now speaks all over the world about her experiences, including a TEDx talk (Jar of Joy), focusing on digital healthcare, self-care, and how to improve the patient experience.

Full details on the appointment can be found here

8th October 2019 – Open Workshop For Employers: How to fully support employees affected by cancer at work

Date posted: March 14, 2019

Changing the conversation about work and cancer

Every two minutes someone is diagnosed with cancer so it’s highly likely that an employee in your organisation will be affected in the near future. It’s easy to think “I’ll wait until it happens” but if it did happen tomorrow how prepared would you feel?

Following the success of our March event, we are pleased to confirm we will be running another Workshop in London on Tuesday 8th October 2019.

The Workshop is designed to equip line managers, team leaders, HR and Occupational Health professionals to:

– Feel confident in handling communication and difficult conversations sensitively and with empathy
– Fully understand how best to support an employee from diagnosis through to a return to work and beyond
– Be aware of legal requirements and how to consider workplace adjustments
– Consider a framework to develop a cancer strategy, policy and action plan

Timing: 10.00 am – 1.00 pm (registration and coffee at 9.30 am)

Venue: Lockton Companies LLP, The St. Botolph Building, 138 Houndsditch, London, EC3A 7AG

Cost: £250 (+ VAT) or £175 (+ VAT) for charities/social enterprises (Early bird rate of £225 (+ VAT) applies if booked by 30th June 2019)

Further details on the Workshop, and how to register, can be found here.

Terms and Conditions can be found here.

‘I have cancer but I want to work. Working rights of cancer patients’. An initiative of the ABC Global Alliance

Date posted: February 4, 2019

Meeting Report

‘I have cancer but I want to work. Working rights of cancer patients’. An initiative of the ABC Global Alliance  7 November 2018, European Parliament, Brussels, Belgium.

On 7 November Barbara Wilson took part at an event at the European Parliament in Brussels, organised by the ABC Global Alliance, calling on European politicians and policymakers to implement consistent and flexible policies to enable cancer patients and cancer survivors to return to work.

Barbara had three key messages for the meeting:

  • There must be a consistent EU-wide framework that supports all people with cancer who face discrimination in the workplace.
  • It is possible for most people with cancer, even those who are terminally ill, to continue to work if they wish to do so
  • Information must be given to employers and employees on what to expect during and after cancer treatment and how to manage at work. This means regular communication about the side-effects of treatment and having the flexibility to make adjustments for a gradual and successful return to work

To read the full report of the meeting click here